LG’s 2020 OLED TVs ship soon, start at $1,500 and go up to $30,000

ad_1]

LG Signature OLED 8K

LG’s new TVs include 8K models that start at twenty grand for 77 inches.


Sarah Tew/CNET

Amid all the bad news about the coronavirus pandemic, TV tech nerds can take solace in one constant: TV makers have mostly told me new sets will ship on schedule this spring. And that includes my favorite high-end TV over the last few years, LG’s OLED-based models. The newest versions, first announced at CES in January, range widely in size and price but none are cheap: they start at $1,500 for the baseline 55-inch and a new 48-inch size. But if you’re sitting at home streaming more Netflix than ever and hungering for a sweet new TV to watch it all on, it doesn’t get much sweeter than these.

LG confirmed to CNET that its 2020 TVs will ship on time despite the COVID-19 outbreak. “As a multinational corporation, LG Electronics maintains manufacturing facilities and suppliers all over the world, giving us the flexibility to best manage our supply chain,” said John Taylor, Senior Vice President of Public Affairs. “Although at this time we are not experiencing major disruptions, LG is looking into ways to minimize the effect on our production schedule in the event of a drawn-out scenario.”

https://www.cnet.com/


Now playing:
Watch this:

LG’s OLED 2020 TVs are rollable, 8K and flush-mount



6:07

The first 2020 OLED models are scheduled to arrive this month with more becoming available through June. Here’s where I remind you that if you want a good bargain, now is not the best time to buy a 2020 TV. New models just started coming out, prices are at their highest and they’ll fall throughout the year until November (aka Black Friday time). The 65-inch B9 went down from $2,300 to $1,800 last year and there’s no reason to expect the 2020 version — which starts at the same price — won’t follow the same pattern.

LG 2020 OLED TVs

Series Model Size Price Shipping
BX OLED55BXPUA 55-inch $1,500 May
BX OLED65BXPUA 65-inch $2,300 May
CX OLED48CXPUA 48-inch $1,500 June
CX OLED55CXPUA 55-inch $1,800 March
CX OLED65CXPUA 65-inch $2,800 April
CX OLED77CXPUA 77-inch $5,000 May
GX OLED55GXPUA 55-inch $2,500 April
GX OLED65GXPUA 65-inch $3,500 April
GX OLED77GXPUA 77-inch $6,000 April
WX OLED65WXPUA 65-inch $5,000 June
ZX (8K) OLED77GXPUA 77-inch $20,000 May
ZX (8K) OLEDGXPUA 85-inch $30,000 May

Lineup breakdown, new features

BX series: For the last two years, LG’s entry-level OLEDs like the B9 have garnered my highest praise by delivering basically-just-as-good picture quality (despite their step-down processors) for less. The BX has all of the features of the CX (below) aside from the Gen 3 processor and Nvidia G-Sync.

In addition to Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos, all 2020 OLED models get Filmmaker Mode, which is designed to better reflect the director’s intent by disabling the soap opera effect and tweaking other picture and processor settings. It will replace the Technicolor mode found on older LG sets. Separately, new LG OLEDs also get Dolby Vision IQ, another new 2020 feature exclusive to Dolby Vision HDR content.

011-lg-48-inch-cx-gaming

LG’s newest screen size, a relatively small 48 inches, seen here in a gaming setup as a plus-sized monitor.


Sarah Tew/CNET

CX series: The workhorse of the 2020 lineup and the first to ship, this is the only one to include the new 48-inch size and the cheapest to get LG’s latest processor. Compared to the A9 Gen 2 found on 2019 models like the C9, it has improved “AI picture enhancement” technology and can automatically optimize picture and sound quality based on genre. I’ve found it tough to spot processing differences in the past so we’ll see if 2020 is any different. 

LG introduced Nvidia G-Sync compatibility last year and in 2020 it’s again offering the feature, which improved gaming video quality with compatible devices, on CX and higher models. All LG sets also offer variable refresh rate with compatible PCs and consoles. 

GX series: The chassis of the “Gallery” GX is ultrathin, just 20mm in depth and comes with a proprietary mount that keeps it almost flush with the wall. The GX and more-expensive series also get two features not found on the CX and BX: NextGen TV (aka ATSC 3.0) over-the-air tuners that work with the newest antenna broadcasts, and built-in microphones that can be set to always-on, always listening so you won’t have to use the voice remote to access LG’s own ThinQ voice service (“Hi, LG”). Like last year, LG TVs have both Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa built in too — but to access them you’ll need to speak into the remote.

016-lg-gx-series

A special flush mount lets the super-slim GX series hug the wall.


Sarah Tew/CNET

WX series: Want your wall mount even more flush? The 2020 version of the “wallpaper” OLED TV is the most expensive that isn’t 8K.

ZX series: LG’s only 2020 OLED TVs with 8K resolution come in two massive sizes and you can’t afford either one. LG touts better image quality than competing Samsung 8K TVs thanks to so-called Real 8K technology, enough to earn them the CTA 8K Ultra HD logo. I won’t get into the gory details since what really matters is whether anybody can see any difference — a question best left until I can review one. 

Speaking of really expensive TVs LG didn’t provide updated availability or official pricing on the RX series, its rollable model, saying that information would come at a later date. Last I was told its unofficial price was $60,000 and it would ship in the second or third quarter. 

Note that, as with a certain phone, LG wants us to say “10” instead of “X,” so the CX is pronounced “C10” and so on. I’ll try to remember to do that.

When can we expect reviews, Katzmaier?

Sorry guys, but like everything else this spring new TV reviews will be delayed. I had a meeting scheduled for this week with LG’s reps to go over the first sample I’ll be receiving, a 65-inch CX, but that’s put on hold while we sort everything out. Right now like many people I’m working from home, which means not going into the lab for reviews. 

I can’t say when I expect to get reviews rolling again but when that happens, LG’s new OLEDs will be among my first priorities.





Cnet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *