Last D-Day craft makes final journey after Portsmouth revamp


LCT 7074 serving in WW2Image copyright
Royal Navy

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More than 800 tank landing craft took part in the D-Day landings on 6 June 1944

The last surviving D-Day tank landing craft is making its final journey.

LCT 7074 has been renovated with a National Heritage Lottery fund £4.7m grant ahead of its permanent display at the D-Day Story museum in Southsea.

It had been due to be delivered on the 76th anniversary of D-Day on 4 June but this was delayed due to coronavirus.

The craft has successfully travelled from Portsmouth Naval Base to Southsea and is due to be installed at the museum by 09:00 BST.

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Media captionThe sunken vessel was raised from Birkenhead Docks in a two-day operation in 2015

Delays to restoration work on the 59m-long, 300-tonne ship added £75,000 to its cost, the National Museum of the Royal Navy previously said.

The work has included attaching a restored funnel, replacement guns and rocket launchers.

Image copyright
IWM

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LCT 7074 landed on Gold Beach on D-Day

Image copyright
IWM

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It put 10 tanks and a contingent of soldiers ashore at about 02:00 on 7 June 1944

LCT 7074 was one of more than 800 specially designed landing craft vessels involved in the D-Day landings.

It arrived at Gold Beach, surviving German shell fire which sank the craft next to it.

It put 10 tanks and a contingent of soldiers ashore at about 02:00 on 7 June 1944 before returning to England with prisoners of war.

The 183ft (57m) vessel later became a floating nightclub before sinking in a semi-derelict condition at Birkenhead Docks.

Since 2014, the National Museum of the Royal Navy has led a project to rescue the amphibious craft from the docks.

Image copyright
David Botwinik/Maritime Films UK

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Restrictions implemented in March prevented the landing craft being moved from Portsmouth Naval Base earlier



BBC News