Euro 2020: Scotland’s Andy Robertson can see packed Hampden singing Whigfield



Captain Andy Robertson is already dreaming of a packed Hampden singing along to Whigfield at Scotland’s first men’s finals appearance in 22 years.

The tune of Whigfield’s 1994 hit, Saturday Night, was borrowed by the squad amid their celebrations.

“I think it’ll stick for the summer,” Robertson, 26, told BBC Scotland.

“I don’t know who put Marsh’s [goalkeeper David Marshall’s] name into it, but I can see the Tartan Army singing it already.

“I hope the whole country can be buzzing and we’re back to some sort of normality.

“I’ve been through six or seven years of hurt trying to get us there, but they have been through a lot longer and they deserve the moment to enjoy us at a major tournament again.”

Thursday’s win after extra-time and penalties in Belgrade extended Scotland’s winning run to nine games.

Liverpool left-back Robertson hopes qualification will help heal what he suggests has been a “disconnect” between the fans and the national team during previous runs of disappointing results.

“Pre-Covid, we were lucky to get 20,000 at Hampden – that was the reality – and there was maybe a breakdown in the relationship between the players and the fans,” he said.

“Some of the performances deserved that – they weren’t good enough.”

Robertson puts the change in fortunes down to the appointment of Steve Clarke in May 2019, describing the head coach as “a breath of fresh air since he came in”.

‘I’ll maybe give myself a pat on the back in two weeks time’

Clarke says he began to realise the “the magnitude” of his achievement in leading Scotland to a major finals after waking up to a flood of congratulatory messages, including from his predecessors.

But the head coach insists he will only allow his thoughts to dwell on the win in Serbia after their next two games – away to Slovakia and Israel in the Nations League.

“It’s a big moment – it’s sinking in slowly,” he told BBC Scotland. “I’m sure by the time we get after the next two games, I can take a little bit of time out, give my grandchildren a hug and enjoy the moment.

“Maybe a couple of weeks in the future I’ll give myself a little pat on the back.”

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